Gun
Walkout Reflection


It is no secret: the anxiety among students in almost all schools is building. Since February 14, 2018, when 17 were massacred in Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, students -- whose main concern should be studying for a hard math test or turning in homework on time -- began to question their safety at school. This created an atmosphere of apprehensiveness, fear even. As the news of Stoneman Douglas hit the nation like a ton of bricks, a call for action rang out: we, the students, had suffered enough since the Columbine High School shooting in 1999. With heads held high, millions of students made the same declaration: Never Again. Survivors of Stoneman Douglas took to the media, rallying and raising support and beginning a new movement, March for Our Lives.This is a cause set on implementing a ban on semiautomatic assault rifles and improving school safety overall. One event organized by March for Our Lives was the famous national school walkout, where students all over the country walked out of their schools at 10:00 AM and stayed out for 17 minutes, one minute for each of the students and teachers that died at Stoneman Douglas.


 

 







Although our school’s walkout was postponed due to a snow day, I was genuinely amazed as I watched our students flood out of school that day. In terms of political and social views, our school has been very divided. However, seeing the amount of support from my fellow peers to make a change that will benefit all of us gave me so much hope for what our generation has to offer. There are a few things, however, that myself and some others were unsatisfied with. For example, while I applaud the administration’s efforts to encourage students to walk out that day, somehow the purpose of the walkout had gotten twisted; instead of funds going to the March for Our Lives movement, they instead went to NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness. It is not to say that mental illness is not a concern; in fact, with the increasing suicide rate among teenagers, mental illness is definitely something we should focus on as a country. However, March for Our Lives was the one that planned the walkout and should have been the ones to receive the funds raised that day. However, with that set aside, it was truly remarkable how the school came together, marching in memory of those whose lives had been cut short at the hands of an assault rifle and marching in solidarity with the determination to change our country forever.

 




 

 

 

 

 

 


2018 Graduation

 


WHS Faculty

 

 

 

Sgt. Perenick